Lift News Article: 3 Canadian moms open up about cannabis

Recently,

Two members of the Strainprint team were profiled in Lift News for Mother’s Day. The article highlights 3 Candian moms who open up about their medical cannabis journeys. Have a look at the full article to learn more about moms and cannabis:

https://news.lift.co/3-canadian-moms-open-cannabis-use/

 

How to talk to your friends (and grandma) about your medical marijuana prescription

Prescription cannabis: tough conversation, important topic

 

So you’ve got yourself a prescription to legally medicate with marijuana. Awesome! But the last thing you want is for your family or friends to suddenly think you have a drug addiction. Instead of hiding your new prescription, have a conversation about it.

A talk about medicinal cannabis with your nearest and dearest likely won’t be as relaxing as taking the actual dose. But with the right approach, lots of knowledge and a bit of tact and patience, it doesn’t have to be gut-wrenching.

Avoid being misunderstood by speaking with your friends (and, yes, even right-winged granny) about your medical prescription in a way that will help them understand your medicine from another perspective. Here are some tips to prepare you for the big chat.

Know the facts and where to get them

Having a firm grasp on the science, laws and, yes, the controversies that surround your treatment will only help when discussing medical cannabis with someone. Maybe you’ve already come across studies or documentation that pertain to your situation. Have everything ready to present.

“The most compelling way to talk to friends about medical cannabis use (if they are interested), is to send a few links to scientifically-oriented articles,” says Stephanie Karasick, co-founder of the mobile cannabis tracking app Strainprint.

And just as important as what you learn, is whom you learn it from, especially in today’s “fake news” era. Arm yourself with knowledge from reputable sources (like Lift!) that use scientific data to generate conclusions and break down this complicated topic in a way that’s easy to understand and communicate. Lift’s printable patient guide is a great resource for new patients, their friends and family. And when it comes to anything in the legal realm, look for official government sources. Health Canada has oodles of info on the cannabis laws in Canada.

“I tailor [the type of articles I send to friends and family], depending on who I’m dealing with,” notes Karasick. “If it’s a physician friend, I’d send Medline articles and research studies; if to my parents, an article from a national publication has most validity.”

Talk about the other drugs you turned down

For many, understanding that cannabis is the most logical and healthful option for your treatment can be enough to win them over. Sometimes you’ve just gotta make them relate.

“One thing I’ve found useful is talking about the drugs I turned down in favour of cannabis, and comparing side effects,” says Devon Scoble, content director at Lift and cannabis patient who takes cannabis oil for a variety of conditions, including inflammatory autoimmune arthritis. “In my case, that was a lifelong low-dose chemotherapy, which makes for a fairly compelling contrast,” says Scoble.

Explain how taking your medications isn’t “getting high”

Scoble says that explaining how her use of CBD, a non-psychoactive yet very medicinal component of cannabis, treats her ailment without making her feel stoned. “The more conservative half of my family came on board pretty quickly when they learned that I could consume cannabis and not get high,” she says.

And what if your prescription does come with psychoactive effects? For some patients, like those suffering from anxiety and depression, THC’s euphoric impact is the therapy. The fact is all drugs have side effects, and many medical marijuana patients say they prefer a cannabis high to the side effects of other pharmaceutical prescriptions.

Be patient and understanding

You know that expression about old dogs and new tricks? Well, there are bound to be some old hounds in your crew that will be stubbornly convinced that marijuana is nothing other than an illegal drug for bad hombres and disillusioned youth. Try to remember to be patient and accepting to these people. In the end, your right to medicate is still paramount.